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. these were things that were going to be discussed. as long as the cease-fire held, egypt being the keeper of the cease-fire, and a senior israeli diplomat told me that they were very glad to see that egypt was filling that role again, mubarak's regime filled the role when he was in power, and they were worried that president morsi was not going to be able to do that because he's more aligned with hamas because he's aligned with the muslim brotherhood. so they're quite happy to see that at least egypt is sort of there, supposed to be the keeper of the peace for the time being. but it is worrying that we're seeing an incident so quickly after the cease-fire was put in place. and a lot of concerns that if this sort of thing starts happening again, there's always incidents along that israel/gaza border that the cease-fire will mean nothing in the next few days. >> sara sidner live for us in jerusalem. as always, thank you. >> i want to bring in stuart holliday the former u.s. ambassador for special political affairs to the united nations. he's currently the president and ceo of the meridian i
they sat down at the negotiating table. of course, with egypt as a immediatier, with the israelis. this time around, they were able to have at least some of their demands be met. first and foremost among those was that the border crossings order, that there is an easing of movement, of people, of goods. and then of course for both sides, it was stopping the violence. the israelis wanted to see an end to the rockets being launched at their population. the palestinians, hamas, wanted to see an end to israel's targeted assassinations to what they call israeli aggression against them. so for many here, this time around versus four years ago, they were able to actually, with an intermediary, again, negotiate a cease-fire. in the sense that they were able to force the israeli side to agree to some of their terms. but we'll have to see if those critical details are, in fact, implemented. will the border crossings really open? will the sea ports really be open? will people be able to have that freedom of movement that they are looking for? this is still, very much, as you say, a first ste
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